Go to home page...
Facebook
Twitter
Google Groups
Go to home page... Go to home page...
 
 
 
U. S. Citizenship > Child Citizenship Act of 2000

CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT OF 2000

The Child Citizenship Act, which became effective on February 27, 2001,amended the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) to provide U.S. citizenship to certain foreign-born children-including adopted children-of U.S. citizens. Specifically, these children include:

• Orphans with a full and final adoption abroad or adoption finalized in the U.S.,

• Biological or legitimated children,

• Certain children born out of wedlock to a mother who naturalizes, and

• Adopted children meeting the two-year custody requirement.

This legislation represents a significant and important change in the nationality laws of the United States. The changes made by the CCA authorize the automatic acquisition of citizenship and permanently protect the adopted children of U.S. Citizens from deportation.

In general, children who are younger than 18 years of age and have at least one parent who is a U.S. citizen whether by birth or naturalization will benefit from this new law. Under the CCA, qualifying children who immigrate to the United States with a U.S. Citizen parent automatically acquire U.S. Citizenship upon entry; children who live abroad acquire citizenship on approval of an application and the taking of the oath of allegiance.

Frequently Asked Questions about the CCA

  1. Does my child qualify for automatic citizenship under the CCA?

  2. Do I have to apply to USCIS for my child's citizenship?

  3. What documentation can I get of my child's citizenship?

  4. Will USCIS automatically provide me with documentation of my child's citizenship?

  5. What forms do I file and what are the fees?

  6. Where should I file the forms?

  7. Is automatic citizenship provided for those who are 18 years of age or older?

  8. Will USCIS publish regulations on the CCA procedures?

  9. What resources are available to answer questions about the Child Citizenship Act?

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

1. Does my child qualify for automatic citizenship under the CCA?

Under CCA, your child will automatically acquire U.S. Citizenship on the date that all of the following requirements are satisfied:

• At least one adoptive parent is a U.S. Citizen,

• The child is under 18 years of age,

• If the child is adopted, a full and final adoption of the child, and

• The child is admitted to the United States as an immigrant

(Back to top)

2. Do I have to apply to USCIS for my child's citizenship?

No. If your child satisfies the requirements listed above, he or she automatically acquires U.S. Citizenship by operation of law on the day he or she is admitted to the United States as an immigrant. Your child’s citizenship status is no longer dependent on USCIS approving a naturalization application.

(Back to top)

3. What documentation can I get of my child's citizenship?

If your child permanently resides in the U.S. you can obtain evidence of your child’s citizenship by applying for a Certificate of Citizenship. You will need to file form N-600 (Application for Certificate of Citizenship) and submit it to the local USCIS District Office or Sub-Office that holds jurisdiction over your permanent residence. You can also apply for a U.S. passport from the Department of State.

If your child permanently resides abroad, your child does not qualify for automatic citizenship under the CCA. However, you can apply for citizenship for your child by filing form N-600K (Application for Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate Under Section 322). You can submit this form to any USCIS District Office or Sub-Office in the United States.

(Back to top)

4. Will USCIS automatically provide me with documentation of my child's citizenship?

At the present time, USCIS is not able to automatically provide most parents with documentation of their foreign-born child’s citizenship. However, USCIS has implemented a streamlined process for newly entering IR-3 children and their families that will ensure they receive a Certificate of Citizenship within 45 days of entering the United States. Additionally, USCIS has implemented procedures to expedite processing of pending N-643 cases. If you previously filed an N-643 application and have not received your child’s Certificate of Citizenship please contact the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283. Please have the following information when you call: your child’s A-number and the location and date you filed the application.

(Back to top)

5. What forms do I file and what are the fees?

If your child permanently resides in the U.S., you can apply for evidence of citizenship by filing form N-600 (Application for Certificate of Citizenship). If you are filing on behalf of an adopted minor child, the fee is $145 (all other applicants must pay $185).

If your child permanently resides abroad, you can apply for citizenship by filing form N-600K (Application for Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate Under Section 322). If you are filing on behalf of an adopted minor child, the fee is $145 (all other applicants must pay $185).

(Back to top)

6. Where should I file the forms?

If your child permanently resides in the U.S., You can file form N-600 (Application for Certificate of Citizenship) at the USCIS District Office or Sub-Office that that holds jurisdiction over your permanent residence.

If your child permanently resides abroad, you can apply for citizenship by filing form N-600K (Application for Citizenship and Issuance of Certificate Under Section 322) at any USCIS District Office or Sub-Office in the United States. You and your child will need to travel to the United States to complete the application process.

(Back to top)

7. Is automatic citizenship provided for those who are 18 years of age or older?

No. Individuals who are 18 years of age or older on February 27, 2001, do not qualify for citizenship under the CCA, even if they meet all other criteria. If they wish to become U.S. Citizens, they must apply for naturalization and meet eligibility requirements that currently exist for adult lawful permanent residents.

(Back to top)

8. Will USCIS publish regulations on the CCA procedures?

The USCIS published interim regulations specific to the CCA in the Federal Register on June 13, 2001. The USCIS is reviewing comments received from individuals and organizations and is in the process of drafting the final regulation.

(Back to top)

9. What resources are available to answer questions about the Child Citizenship Act?

For more information about the CCA application procedures and forms, you may go to the USCIS Web site at www.uscis.gov or contact our National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283. USCIS has also made available field guidance and public materials to all information officers and other front line staff to aid them in answering questions.

Please also read the following for more information:

Child Citizenship Program Fact Sheet, 1/22/04

Information for Parents of Foreign-Born Biological Children Residing in the U.S. January 2004

Information for Adoptive Parents of Foreign-Born Orphans Residing in the U.S. January 2004

Information for Parents of Foreign-Born Children Residing Abroad, January 2004

(Back to top)

 

 

 

MDgreencard.com is the official physician and scientist immigration web site of the:

Sherman Immigration Lawyers, P.C.
Mailing Address
P.O. Box 252133
West Bloomfield, Michigan 48325

Phone: (248) 851-7575
E-mail Us at: info@mdgreencard.com
Street Address (for courier deliveries only)
26111 W. 14 Mile Road
Suite 104
Franklin, Michigan 48025

Copyright © mdgreencard.com. All rights reserved. This site best viewed at 1024 x 768 resolution. Designed and maintained by C2G Media Group, LLC